The Starting Dot on the Map – Coos County, Oregon

The Starting Dot on the Map

We live in a small town on the southern Oregon Coast. We are not beginning our traveling journey because we think the grass is greener on the other side – I’m not sure that there is anywhere that the grass is greener than it is in Oregon. It is beautiful here and I wanted to share what our little dot on the map has to offer, because there is plenty!

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Golden and Silver Falls, Allegany, Oregon

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Siuslaw National Forest – Daphne Grove Campground, Powers, Oregon

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Cape Arago State Park, Charleston, Oregon

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Hobbit Beach & Trail, Florence, Oregon

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Park Creek Campground, Coos Bay District BLM, Oregon

These links and photos are just a tiny example of the beautiful and wild land that is area has to offer. It is certainly worth a visit!

Serenity Remodel Part Four – The Finishing Touches

Serenity Remodel Part Four – The Finishing Touches

Our way of getting a new mattress for the trailer was to simply cut our queen sized cooling gel memory foam mattress down to fit. We had just purchased the mattress back in February and figured we shouldn’t let that go to waste! We used a Gerber Gator Machete [31-000758] to cut the crap out of it (after measuring carefully). We also made a slit in the center of the mattress on the underside, so that it could fold easier into a futon style couch in the trailer. It’s not a perfect fit, but it is pretty comfortable.

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We purchased a few valance curtains, since they were the perfect length for the smaller windows.

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We added a dry erase board as the refrigerator door.

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As you can tell by now, we here at Write on the Road are a couple of geeks. How many fandoms can you find?

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The Remodel Part Four

Serenity Remodel Part Three

Remodel Part 3

The lovely, early 90’s, trailer upholstery did NOT match the black and white theme we were running with. They were faded hunter green seat cushions for the table, with blue and green plaid back rests. The seat cushions were pretty squished and useless. The bed railing and seat edges were upholstered in a fuzzy fabric that used to be pink (I think), but now just resembled Pepto Bismol mixed with mud. Ugh. Nope, gotta go.

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The seats had the hideous plaid back rests for comfort as well as for laying them down to make a bed when the table was lowered. We didn’t need a second bed, as we were pretty sure the dogs could handle sleeping on the floor…maybe. So we just needed to upholster the new seat cushions we were going to get to replace the old flat ones, and the dirty Pepto seat trim and bed rail. I like artsy-fartsy-crafty stuff as long as it doesn’t involve sewing. So, how do we re-upholster the cushions without me having to sew? Staple gun! Not only effective, but somewhat fun if you think about some great action or horror movies scenes over the years! The perfect tool for the job was a Stanley TRE550 Electric Staple/Brad Nail Gun – great for making seat cushions and would probably be efficient in acting out your favorite movie scene as well! (Disclaimer – we are NOT telling you to staple gun your friends and family…or anyone.)

We started by throwing out all the old cushions from the table area. Underneath the seat cushions was a thin panel of wood that stabilized them, and that is what we decided to use as the bottom of the seat cushions to staple fabric to. Now we just need to buy the cushions and the fabric. Wait a minute…we’re frugal, remember?

The trailer had come with a twin size Tempurpedic mattress that was in great condition, but just too small for the two of us. So, we decided to cut it to fit the seat cushions. Now we just needed to buy fabric. Nope. I came up with the idea to upcycle the blackout curtains from our house. The fabric was thick and could be wiped off with a damp cloth; it was perfect.

Well, it was perfect until I decided to throw them in the washer. Don’t do that. The blackout backing peels off in the washer (if you didn’t know that, now you do. If you did know that, don’t judge me – I can’t always be pretty AND smart and that day I picked pretty). My advice is to just take them outside, hose them down, and wipe them clean. In the end, they worked out anyway, it just took some extra wiping and straightening.

The process for reupholstering the cushions was basically to put the new cushion (mattress piece) on top of the (cut-to-fit) upside-down blackout curtain, and then place the wood panel on the underside of the new cushion. Hubby then got on top of it all, squished it all down, pulled the fabric tight, and stapled it to the wood panel. If you’re as old as we feel, don’t worry about the cracking and popping, that’s just your knees and back during this process, I’m sure you’ll be fine.

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We decided not to put the dirty pepto pink seat trim back up, and replaced it with a small wooden trim painted black.

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The bed rail was a lot simpler. It was really just a straight piece of trim that had been upholstered. We didn’t bother removing the old pepto fabric, but simply cut the curtains to fit, pulled the fabric tight, and stapled to the back side of the wood. Voila!

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Total cost so far:
The Serenity: $1000.00

Kilz Primer – 31.25
Paintbrushes/Roller – 6.99
2 cans Spray Paint – $4.00
Gallon Semi-gloss white paint – on hand
Paint tray/roller handle – on hand
Frog Painters Tape – 5.59

Remodel Part 2
Gallon Black Semi Gloss Paint – 11.99 (Fred Meyer Home Design Brand)
Black Spray Paint – (2) 1.99
New drawer and cabinet pulls – (18) On hand from other furniture projects

Remodel Part 3
New foam for cushions – on hand with the mattress that came with trailer
Fabric – Upcycled blackout curtains on hand
Seat trim – $3.99

Serenity Remodel Part Two

The Remodel Part 2

With the walls now a nice shiny (come on, Serenity…shiny…if you don’t get it you need to watch a Joss Whedon TV show, specifically Firefly: The Complete Series) white, we decided to go with black for doors, windows trim, and miscellaneous things like vent covers, light covers, etc.

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We had already removed everything to paint the walls, so that part was already done. We did an initial coat of the KILZ Primer primer again. Then we laid all the doors out on a tarp in the yard and used a roller to cover as much surface as we could; faster and way easier than the contortionist acts that we had to do to paint the inside of the trailer.

A few coats of black paint and they were good to go…sort of. To save money and time, we only painted the outside of the doors. Considering the small space, we knew we wouldn’t be leaving any of the cabinets or doors open, so why bother with the inside? The only issue here was a couple of days of extremely humid weather. The paint didn’t dry as quickly as it would have without the humidity, so there were some runs on the backs and edges of the doors, so we just took some light sandpaper and gently went over the chunky parts; good enough for someone with only slight obsessive issues.

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We bought a semi-gloss black spray paint to paint all of the extra pieces and knobs. This part was easy peasy. (Painting tip for knobs or handles – use a cardboard box and set the knobs up in it. They will stand up straight and you can turn the box to get all sides – I used a Dominoes pizza box.)

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Total cost so far:
The Serenity: $1000.00

Kilz Primer – 31.25
Paintbrushes/Roller – 6.99
2 cans Spray Paint – $4.00
Gallon Semi-gloss white paint – on hand
Paint tray/roller handle – on hand
Frog Painters Tape – 5.59

Remodel Part 2
Gallon Black Semi Gloss Paint – 11.99 (Fred Meyer Home Design Brand)
Black Spray Paint – (2) 1.99
New drawer and cabinet pulls – (18) On hand from other furniture projects

Side note on mixing paint –  If you use a hand held drill to mix your gallon of paint and it slips up farther than it should, it looks like this! Paint flung everywhere!

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The Remodel Part Three

Serenity Remodel Part One

 

 

The Remodel Part 1 –

We decided to start the remodel process by painting. Which really means that you start the remodel process by removing anything and everything from the trailer that is removable. Cushions, cabinet doors, bathroom doors, drawers, bed pieces, etc.

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Next up was scraping the crap out of the paper and laminate on of all the cabinets and walls with a razor blade scraper. This is only difficult if you are impatient, which I am. I may have gouged and marked up some of the pressboard cabinets. Oops. Point is, have patience and go slow it will be better in the long run.

Next step is pretty self explanatory – tape everything. We used FrogTape.

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Primer. We used KILZ Latex Interior/Exterior Primer. Kilz is great coverage for wallpaper and pressboard and gives you the added advantage of stopping any mildew if needed. It is more a more expensive brand, but definitely not one of the things you want to skimp on.

And then for the painting. I began this process thinking it was going to take no time at all and just be a piece of cake. By the time I was done I was completely out of patience, wishing I was a yoga master and my piece of cake was old and stale. It is a lot more difficult than just painting a room in a sticks and bricks house. So many corners, hidey holes, and awkward ways I had to lay on the tiny floor space to reach the tiny cracks and crevices. We started with a latex semi-gloss white paint (already had this for other projects were going to do) for the walls. Larger spaces were covered with a roller and all the corners and small spaces, we used a cheap paint brush.

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First, don’t use a cheap paintbrush; go ahead and spend the couple extra dollars and get a thick one with small bristles. The roller did great on the larger areas and only needed two coats. On the brushed areas we were on coat #3 and it was still streaky. We racked our brains for a few seconds and decided to get some cans of semi-gloss white spray paint to cover all the corner areas. It came about better than expected and I’m happy with it, considering the amount of money we saved, even if we didn’t save on the frustration. (“Duh” tip – open the windows in your trailer while spray painting, it gets very strong smelling, very fast.)

Total cost so far:
Trailer: $1000.00

Kilz Primer – 31.25
Paintbrushes/Roller – 6.99
2 cans Spray Paint – $4.00
Gallon Semi-gloss white paint – on hand
Paint tray/roller handle – on hand
Frog Painters Tape – 5.59

 

The Remodel Part Two